Big City, Little Homestead

Living rural in the city is hip and urban – and you can, too.

Category: Biophilia (page 1 of 4)

How can you protect birds during nesting season? (Short answer: don’t cut trees). And, BirdFest.

Migration is pretty much over now, and all birds are where they want to be if they’re sitting on eggs in a nest, or raising a clutch of nestlings. It might give us an opportunity to have a peep into their nests and niches and see them raise their babies (mostly by web-cam – this is something we all love!), but it doesn’t mean the dangers they face are completely over. There are still things to watch out for in the city…

Tree Felling During Nesting Season

Every spring, members of my local birding club notice incidents of tree cutting and felling in and around Montreal during this period, when birds are nesting. Even trained ornithologists have difficulty locating nests, so we’re concerned that these activities may harm or even be fatal to nesting birds.

Perhaps making matters worse is that while tree felling is an activity a homeowner needs a permit for, the permit process might not take into account the time of the felling  – and the businesses that fell trees, like landscaping services, haven’t needed to have a license from the RBQ – the Régie du Bâtiment du Québec. We can’t know whether a license would necessarily help birds, but it’s at least one avenue of contractor education.

What can you do if you witness tree felling during nesting season in your neighbourhood? One or all of the following:

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Sorry, reader – this is for FB Review

I’m developing an app and it needs to be reviewed. FB gnomes need to review this. So I have to leave it up until done and approved. I’ll back date it so it’s not on the front page.

Here, have a picture of Hervé when I first got him!

Hervé assuming the "love me" position

Visiting one of the last remaining urban wetlands – the Technoparc

Two weekends ago, I participated in the Good Friday Migration to save the Technoparc Wetlands. Read more about it – and see the French-language Pimento Report on YouTube (embedded) here.

With this post, I wanted to mention to readers that I’ve got a new pop-up to subscribe to my email list. See a similar box at the bottom of this post for more details.

I’ve been draggin’ my heels on writing this post ever since, for a false reason. I’ve been making it a bigger deal of writing a blog post than in than the writing actually is, because the issue is a bigger deal than most people realize. So I might say something controversial, but seems clear enough for someone to say.

Part of the game of development is “build it and they’ll come.” There’s no big influx (except if it’s downtown – proper brownfield building development!) but in the meantime, the first occupants will pay for servicing the building and the taxes. Though this is just kicking the can down the road, cities sees that new development, that new tax base as proof of … something usually vanity-related, and a revenue base for existing services. In time, because there’s no incentive for municipalities to forego development without a large NIMBY crowd, their services:tax base ratio will get skewed again. Development sure looks like a Ponzi scheme.

This is the view of the park from overhead, from the south.

Situated in this tension, with no voice but for those who speak up in time, is nature, where the birds carry on with their nestlings like they always have, only the conditions are less and less optimal while development games are played to make them unwelcome. Continue reading

Rewilding Event – upcoming this weekend

Six weeks before the frost sets in (traditionally, people consider Canadian Thanksgiving the first-frost date, but it comes later), gardeners can get an early start on the next year’s garden and crops. This time of year is perfect for doing transplants, as roots are not as subject to water and heat stress, and have a chance to establish themselves before the coming winter .

I’ve decided that it’s time for an event: a fall-oriented gardening session. We’ll prepare a garden for next year, and plant native species. This event is for the avid or casual gardener, or anyone who wants to get their hands dirty while learning about native and cultivated plants for biodiverse wildlife gardens. You are welcome to bring plants from your garden for swapping with other gardeners.

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