Big City, Little Homestead

Living rural in the city.

Category: Biophilia (page 1 of 3)

Visiting one of the last remaining urban wetlands – the Technoparc

Two weekends ago, I participated in the Good Friday Migration to save the Technoparc Wetlands. Read more about it – and see the French-language Pimento Report on YouTube (embedded) here.

With this post, I wanted to mention to readers that I’ve got a new pop-up to subscribe to my email list. See a similar box at the bottom of this post for more details.

I’ve been draggin’ my heels on writing this post ever since, for a false reason. I’ve been making it a bigger deal of writing a blog post than in than the writing actually is, because the issue is a bigger deal than most people realize. So I might say something controversial, but seems clear enough for someone to say.

Part of the game of development is “build it and they’ll come.” There’s no big influx (except if it’s downtown – proper brownfield building development!) but in the meantime, the first occupants will pay for servicing the building and the taxes. Though this is just kicking the can down the road, cities sees that new development, that new tax base as proof of … something usually vanity-related, and a revenue base for existing services. In time, because there’s no incentive for municipalities to forego development without a large NIMBY crowd, their services:tax base ratio will get skewed again. Development sure looks like a Ponzi scheme.

Situated in this tension, with no voice but for those who speak up in time, is nature, where the birds carry on with their nestlings like they always have, only the conditions are less and less optimal while development games are played to make them unwelcome. Continue reading

Rewilding Event – upcoming this weekend

Six weeks before the frost sets in (traditionally, people consider Canadian Thanksgiving the first-frost date, but it comes later), gardeners can get an early start on the next year’s garden and crops. This time of year is perfect for doing transplants, as roots are not as subject to water and heat stress, and have a chance to establish themselves before the coming winter .

I’ve decided that it’s time for an event: a fall-oriented gardening session. We’ll prepare a garden for next year, and plant native species. This event is for the avid or casual gardener, or anyone who wants to get their hands dirty while learning about native and cultivated plants for biodiverse wildlife gardens. You are welcome to bring plants from your garden for swapping with other gardeners.

Continue reading

Butterflies to see and links to share for Pollinator Week

It’s said that birds, bats, bees, butterflies, beetles, and other small mammal pollinators are responsible for one out of every three bites of our food. Pollinating flowers is a serious job. And thus, the Pollinator Partnership organization created an event called Pollinator Week, every year around the third week of June – this year, it’s June 19-25. I blogged about it a few years ago, with a bonus DIY Mason Bee house project.  So, to inspire people to do something to appreciate or even help our pollinators, I found a few links to share. Nature herself also motivated me: the cover photo for this post came from my recent trip to the Adirondacks, where I found a bunch of Eastern Swallowtail butterflies mud-puddling on the beach.

If pollinators had dating profiles, these would be those. This is an article by the US Fish and Wildlife Service, on my favourite publishing platform, Medium. It’s cute and clever and I learned a few species.

Continue reading

Things you didn’t know about wasps

I once wrote about small paper wasp hives at residences. Today’s post is because when August sets in, wasps can become rather bothersome. The reason wasps are so pesteriferous! lately is that they are male and it’s the end of the season. They’ve served their purpose of gathering food for the larvae, so they’re no longer getting nectar rewards. Starving, they are looking for anything sweet to eat.

That’s not the only way in which the female wasps cut off the males. They also “stuff” them into cells to starve them.  

My neighbour’s tree was dropping apples all over the ground, so that’s where the wasps were. They were very peaceful, and were probably drunk (like moose get, too).

In 2014, I had a bunch of hornets hanging around drinking sap from a wounded sumac tree. A nylon cord I’d used to keep the tree upright when it was flopping over had restricted its growth, and so it was cutting into the new bark. Of course, hornets are big, so I was worried about the potential for stings.  The sooner the wound would stop seeping, the sooner they would go away. So to hurry the process along, I hosed the tree down a few times a day, and cleaned the wound while the hornets were stunned.

Not all wasps are dangerous to people. They can be beneficial, too. 

Moral: If you are getting bothered by wasps this time of year, put out some sugar water or juice a little ways away from you’re sitting, and don’t panic.

Older posts