Big City, Little Homestead

Living rural in the city.

Butterflies to see and links to share for Pollinator Week

It’s said that birds, bats, bees, butterflies, beetles, and other small mammal pollinators are responsible for one out of every three bites of our food. Pollinating flowers is a serious job. For this reason, the Pollinator Partnership organization created an event called Pollinator Week, every year around the third week of June – this year (2017), it’s June 19-25. I blogged about it a few years ago, with a bonus DIY Mason Bee house project.

It’s very important to give honeybees and native insect pollinators as much habitat and food as we possibly can, because of Colony Collapse Disorder. In absence of remedies to prevent this disease from killing the honey bees that pollinate our non-native food crops, only natural resistance, the kind where survivors (in particular, survivor queens) go on to create new hives, will improve the survival rates of beehives. In addition, honey bees are very competitive with native pollinator species, so we need to make sure that the natives get a fair crack at food sources – specifically native plants, which honey bees are less adept at pollinating.

So, to inspire people to do something to appreciate or even help our pollinators, I found a few links to share. Nature herself also motivated me: the cover photo for this post came from my recent trip to the Adirondacks, where I found a bunch of Eastern Swallowtail butterflies mud-puddling on the beach.

  • If pollinators had dating profiles, these would be those. This is an article by the US Fish and Wildlife Service, on my favourite publishing platform, Medium. It’s cute and clever and I learned a few species.
  • Updated in 2018: there’s also an Irish website, “Don’t Mow, Let it Grow,” dedicated to education about helping pollinator species such as bees. They have an animated cartoon series suitable for children to explain what bees and other pollinating insects do. (Note for little children: it would be helpful for a parent to read the titles on the animation!)

What more can we lawn-owners and gardeners do to help bees and other insect pollinators, such as butterflies?

  • Make your Garden a Sanctuary for Bees – this article is an old favourite (2014).
  • The Canadian Wildlife Federation has a few handouts with in-depth information on creating food and habitat for pollinators in your garden. (Look for a “Poster and Handout” kind of link in your search there, they have moved the resource in question). This is the page for butterflies. You’ll find a library of information on biodiversity and all the campaigns that the CWF supports. They are my go-to place for information related to wildlife gardening, and for making our towns and cities welcoming to nature again.

I have a puzzle for you:

While I was watching the Eastern Swallowtails (27 of them!) at the beach, I saw a Red Admiral butterfly also mud-puddling. (Here is an Instagram photo (follow me!) of one that was sunning itself in the backyard last week.) Another butterfly also was there, on the beach, and I’m going to give you the photograph below, and turn on the comments for this post.

Q: Can you tell me what butterfly this is? And how can you tell the difference between a butterfly and a moth?

Mourning cloak butterfly

Specie is in the comments!

A gift for pollinators, and newsletter subscribers:

Milkweed is a perennial plant that many insects rely on for food and shelter, such as the now-endangered Monarch butterfly. If you’d like to receive a packet of milkweed seeds, sign up to my list (the newsletter will begin when I attain a certain threshold of subscribers). Reply to your list confirmation email with your address, and I will send you a packet. You can plant them this year or next.

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Also published on Medium.

4 Comments

  1. Butterflies have smooth antennae and moths have fern-like antennae.

    • Jane Sorensen

      June 23, 2017 at 2:09 pm

      That’s a lovely blog post about the Mourning Cloak Butterfly! Thank you for finding and posting it!

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